TRENDS AND DETERMINANTS OF MODERN CONTRACEPTIVE USE AMONG CURRENTLY MARRIED WOMEN IN AMHARA NATIONAL REGIONAL STATE OF ETHIOPIA

Main Article Content

Nega Mihret
Getachew Nibret
Tariku Dejene

Abstract

Ethiopia is the second most populous country in Africa with high fertility and fast population growth rate. It is also one of the countries with high maternal and child mortality rate in sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, family planning is a crucial strategy to halt this problem. The overall trends of modern contraceptive use dramatically increased in Amhara National Regional State, from 6.6% in 2000 to 15.7% in 2005 and 33.0% in 2011, although still relatively very low. This study, therefore, examined the trends and determinants of current modern contraception among currently married, non-pregnant women of reproductive age in the region using the 2000, 2005 and 2011 Ethiopia Demographic and Health Surveys. The analysis was based on 2587, 2330, and 2776 women of reproductive age, for the 2000, 2005, and 2011 surveys, respectively. Data management and analysis were carried out using STATA 13. Multivariate analysis of binary logistic regression was employed for each survey. The findings indicate that women living in rural areas had less likelihood of modern contraceptive use in 2000 (AOR = 0.260, 95% CI = 0.0843- 0.801) and 2005 (AOR = 0.396, 95% CI = 0.203-0.771). The effect of wealth was more pronounced in 2005 (AOR = 1.906, 95% CI = 1.165-3.118) and in 2011 (AOR = 1.653, 95% CI = 1.173-2.329). The likelihood of contraceptive use among employed women was higher in 2005 (AOR = 1.989, 95% CI = 1.298-3.049) and in 2011 (AOR = 1.441, 95% CI = 1.072-1.939). Older women were less likely to use contraception as opposed to younger women in 2000 (AOR = 0.0673, 95% CI = 0.0140-0.322) and in 2011 (AOR = 0.296, 95% CI = 0.125-0.700). In conclusion, residence, wealth quintiles, employment status, women’s current age, and child mortality were significantly associated with the use of modern contraceptives during 2000-2011 in the region. The regional health bureau and concerned stakeholders should focus on empowering women economically, integrating family planning into maternal and child health services, and accessing services to youths’ and in rural areas to accelerate contraception in the region.

Article Details

Section
Articles